Emergency Medical Products, Inc. Launches New Website with Enhanced Capabilities and User Experience

DUBLIN, Ohio, Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Emergency Medical Products (EMP) launched their new-and-improved website on October 4, 2020. The fully-responsive site offers a seamless online shopping experience on virtually any device. Enhanced functionality and features allow users to effortlessly place orders at buyemp.com.

The website offers easy-to-use search and navigation functions to help users shop over 8,000 medical and safety products. Capabilities like faceted search help easily and efficiently filter down to the perfect product, while the product availability feature provides an accurate stock status of the desired item.

There are a number of other notable site proficiencies that deserve recognition. The improved Loyalty Rewards Program allows users to earn points on every product purchased online, and redeem those points for credit on future orders. Multiple supply lists can be created and shared for quick and easy ordering of frequently purchased items. Finally, self-serve reports enable customers to view previous orders, purchase summaries and more.

“We are very excited to announce the launch of our newly designed, mobile-responsive website,” said Andrew Love, Vice President and General Manager, EMP. “As a leading provider of medical supplies and equipment, we wanted to offer a new site that is user-friendly, easy to navigate and provides users the information needed to quickly make informed buying decisions.”

About Sarnova and Emergency Medical Products
Emergency Medical Products (EMP) is part of the Sarnova family of companies—the leading national specialty distributor of healthcare products across four major business units: Bound Tree Medical, Cardio Partners, Emergency Medical Products and Tri-anim Health Services.

Emergency Medical Products (EMP) is dedicated to helping those who save and improve patient lives. For nearly 50 years, EMP has provided medical supplies to healthcare professionals and first responders. EMP continually expands their product offering to better meet the needs of

SpaceX Starlink brings Internet to emergency responders in wildfire areas

Pictures of a SpaceX broadband-satellite dish and wildfire-ravaged areas of Washington State.
Enlarge / A Starlink user terminal and wildfire-devastated areas seen in images shared by Washington state’s Emergency Management Division.

SpaceX Starlink is providing Internet access to Washington state emergency responders in areas ravaged by wildfires. The group has deployed seven Starlink user terminals (i.e. satellite dishes) since it began using the service in early August, as CNBC reported yesterday:

“I have never set up any tactical satellite equipment that has been as quick to set up, and anywhere near as reliable” as Starlink, Richard Hall, the emergency telecommunications leader of the Washington State Military Department’s IT division, told CNBC in an interview Monday.

The broadband service has helped both emergency responders and families in wildfire-stricken areas. Hall “has set up terminals in areas that were burned severely to provide evacuated families with wireless calling and Internet access to file insurance claims,” CNBC wrote. Hall said he also “did setup to allow kids to do some of their initial schooling.”

Hall said Starlink has “easily double[d] the bandwidth” compared to traditional satellite broadband and consistently provides latency of less than 30ms.

Traditional geostationary satellites that orbit at altitudes of more than 35,000km provide latency to residential customers of about 600ms, according to Federal Communications Commission measurements, making them a poor substitute for cable or fiber. Starlink, with its low-Earth orbits of 540km to 570km, can deliver something much closer to the experience provided by wired broadband services, despite skepticism expressed by the FCC.

Compared to Starlink, Hall said that traditional satellite provides “a lot less speed and bandwidth and a lot higher latency in a much larger package.” On Monday, Washington’s Emergency Management Division said on Twitter that it’s happy to have Starlink “as emergency responders look to help residents rebuild the town of Malden, WA that was overcome by wildfires

SpaceX’s Starlink in action: Internet satellites keep emergency workers online amid wildfires

It’s emerged that SpaceX’s Starlink satellites have been delivering internet services since early August to the Washington state military’s emergency management unit helping residents recover from recent wildfires.

As noted by CNBC, providing services to Washington emergency responders is the first publicly known application of the satellite broadband service.   

SpaceX is currently conducting private Starlink beta trials with residents in some parts of northern US and lower Canada, including remote communities in Washington state, Starlink revealed in an FAQ posted on Reddit in July. 

The Washington emergency division has been using seven Starlink user terminals, which SpaceX Elon Musk has previously described as like a “UFO on a stick”, with a skyward-facing disk that measures 48cm, or 19 inches, in diameter.  

Musk has previously described the end-user terminals as being as easy to set up as “point at sky and just plug in”. 

Richard Hall, the emergency telecommunications leader of the Washington State Military Department’s IT division, appears to confirm Musk’s claim. 

“I have never set up any tactical satellite equipment that has been as quick to set up and anywhere near as reliable [as Starlink],” Hall told CNBC. 

Hall also suggested Starlink was superior to other satellite broadband services his unit has used previously. Starlink satellites orbit Earth at about an altitude of 500km, or 311 miles, far closer to Earth than traditional conventional satellite broadband services. 

According to Hall, Starlink offers double the bandwidth of other services and said he’d seen more than 150% decreases in latency. “I’ve seen lower than 30 millisecond latency consistently,” he said. 

That’s a pretty good third-party reference for Starlink, which has faced doubts from the Federal Communications Commission as to whether it can deliver round-trip latencies below the 50ms that it has claimed in an FCC application to launch 30,000 satellites. In

Washington emergency responders use SpaceX Starlink satellite internet

Washington Emergency Management Division

The Starlink satellite internet network that SpaceX is developing has been used in the field by Washington state emergency responders in recent weeks, the first early application of the company’s service to be disclosed.

Washington’s state military, which includes its emergency response division, began employing Starlink user terminals in early August to bring internet service to areas devastated by wildfires. User terminals are the small devices on the ground that connect to the satellites. The emergency division has seven Starlink user terminals, which it is deploying with early success.

“I have never set up any tactical satellite equipment that has been as quick to set up, and anywhere near as reliable” as Starlink, Richard Hall, the emergency telecommunications leader of the Washington State Military Department’s IT division, told CNBC in an interview Monday.

How Washington’s using Starlink

Starlink is the name for SpaceX’s ambitious plan to build an interconnected internet satellite network, also known as a “constellation,” to deliver high-speed internet to anywhere on the planet.

The full Starlink network is planned to have about 12,000 satellites flying in what is known as low Earth orbit, much closer to the surface than traditional broadband satellites. Hall, whose division has used other satellite broadband services, said “there’s really no comparison” between Starlink and traditional networks, where the satellites are farther away from the Earth in Geosynchronous or medium earth orbits.

“Starlink easily doubles the bandwidth” in comparison, Hall said, noting that he’s seen more than 150% decreases in latency. “I’ve seen lower than 30 millisecond latency consistently,” he said.

Hall said that, with other traditional services, it typically takes between 30 minutes to an hour to set up a satellite connection, “with a lot less speed and bandwidth and a lot higher latency in a much larger

Washington emergency responders first to use SpaceX’s Starlink internet in the field: ‘It’s amazing’

  • Washington’s state military, which includes its emergency response division, began using Starlink user terminals in early August to bring internet service to areas devastated by wildfires.
  • “I have spent the better part of four or five hours with some satellite equipment trying to get a good [connection]. So, to me, it’s amazing,” Washington state’s emergency telecommunications leader Richard Hall told CNBC.
  • Washington has used Starlink to get regions “zero day communications,” Hall said.



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The Starlink satellite internet network that SpaceX is developing has been used in the field by Washington state emergency responders in recent weeks, the first early application of the company’s service to be disclosed.

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Washington’s state military, which includes its emergency response division, began employing Starlink user terminals in early August to bring internet service to areas devastated by wildfires. User terminals are the small devices on the ground that connect to the satellites. The emergency division has seven Starlink user terminals, which it is deploying with early success.

“I have never set up any tactical satellite equipment that has been as quick to set up, and anywhere near as reliable” as Starlink, Richard Hall, the emergency telecommunications leader of the Washington State Military Department’s IT division, told CNBC in an interview Monday.

How Washington’s using Starlink

Starlink is the name for SpaceX’s ambitious plan to build an interconnected internet satellite network, also known as a “constellation,” to deliver high-speed internet to anywhere on the planet.

The full Starlink network is planned to have about 12,000 satellites flying in what is known as low Earth orbit, much closer to the surface than traditional broadband satellites. Hall, whose division has used other satellite broadband services, said “there’s really no comparison” between Starlink and traditional networks, where the satellites are farther away from