Cleveland Metroparks Outdoor Education Programming Returns

October 13, 2020

Free guided hikes offer exploration and adventure throughout fall season

Cleveland Metroparks today announced that outdoor education programs are returning this weekend. Beginning Saturday, October 17, park naturalists will be leading daily guided hikes across the Park District to offer guests a way to stay active and explore fall in the Emerald Necklace.

Park naturalists will offer a variety of hikes for all ages including birding, history, night hikes as well as family-friendly hikes. Outdoor recreation specialists will also offer weekend “try-it” sessions where guests can learn a new outdoor recreation skill. In total, Cleveland Metroparks will be offering approximately 40 programs per week.

“Parks have provided an important outlet for our community this past year and we hope these guided hikes can help us stay active and connected with nature through the cooler months,” said Brian M. Zimmerman, Cleveland Metroparks CEO.

Group size per program will be limited to less than 10 people following CDC guidelines and advance registration online is required. Registration will not be available in-person or by phone. Additionally, facial coverings must be worn by all participants unless under six years of age. Due to demand, guests are limited to one program per week.

Cleveland Metroparks will also continue to offer virtual nature learning with its “Ask a Naturalist” series on Facebook Live every Friday at 1 p.m. for those unable to participate during in-person programming.

The naturalist led programming will be free to the public with the exception of Outdoor Recreation events that require a $5 equipment rental such as bicycles or watersport rentals.

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Cleveland Metroparks outdoor education programming returning this weekend

Get ready for some adventure! 



a group of people walking in a park


© Provided by WKYC-TV Cleveland


Cleveland Metroparks announced that their outdoor education programs will be returning this weekend. Beginning Saturday, October 17, you will be able to take daily hikes guided by park naturalists across the Park District to explore the fall season in the Emerald Necklace.

A number of hikes will be offered for all ages including birding, history, night hikes as well as family-friendly hikes. Visitors will also have the opportunity for “try-it” sessions, where guests can learn a new outdoor recreation skill from specialists. 

Approximately 40 programs per week will be made made available to those looking to stay active and explore the parks.

“Parks have provided an important outlet for our community this past year and we hope these guided hikes can help us stay active and connected with nature through the cooler months,” said Brian M. Zimmerman, Cleveland Metroparks CEO.

Each program will be limited to less than 10 people, per the CDC’s guidelines and advance registration online only is required. Facial covers are also required to be worn by all guests unless under the age of six. Due to high demand and limited group sizes, guests are limited to only one program per week. 

The popular “Ask a Naturalist” digital series on Facebook Live every Friday at 1:00 p.m. will continue to be offered for those unable to participate during in-person programming.

The guided hikes will be free to the public with the exception of Outdoor Recreation events that require a $5 equipment rental such as bicycle or watersport rentals. 

RELATED: Cleveland Metroparks Zoo offering free virtual classroom via

Molokai slow internet causing problems for education, work

HONOLULU (AP) — Slow internet service has become an increasing problem for Molokai residents on Hawaiian Home Lands properties.

Service provided by a single telecom provider has caused difficulties for residents working at home or families engaged in distance learning, Hawaii Public Radio reported Monday.

Sandwich Isles Communication secured an exclusive license with the state Department of Hawaiian Home Lands in 1995 to bring telecom services to rural homestead communities. In return, other companies must use and pay for the Sandwich Isles infrastructure to reach customers.

Sandwich Isles founder Al Hee was convicted of federal tax fraud, served nearly four years in prison and faces nearly $50 million in fines for defrauding the U.S. government. The company was stripped of $257 million in assets.

Democratic state Rep. Lynn DeCoite, who represents Molokai, said she has received numerous complaints from homesteaders.


“Anger, frustration. You can’t even get through to a live body to talk about what the situation is, or negotiations of how they can have their bills paid, or you can transfer over to another carrier,” DeCoite said.

Hawaiian homesteader Kui Adolpho said her only option for service in Hoolehua is Sandwich Isles, but frozen screens and constant buffering are a daily ordeal for her three children taking elementary school classes at home.

Adolpho also works from home, adding to the strain on limited bandwidth.

She began an online petition to raise awareness about the problems, noting that some homesteaders have to pay for internet hot spots to obtain adequate service.

“I expected lags and, you know, the occasional interruptions. But it got to the point where my children couldn’t even get instruction at all,” Adolpho said.

Sandwich Isles said it is aware of the problems with internet speed and plans to upgrade its infrastructure.

The company also said it

SoftBank invests $215 million in education start-up Kahoot

Masayoshi Son, chairman and chief executive officer of SoftBank Group Corp., reacts during a dialog session with Jack Ma, former chairman of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., not pictured, at Tokyo Forum 2019 in Tokyo, Japan, on Friday, Dec. 6, 2019.

Kiyoshi Ota | Bloomberg via Getty Images

LONDON — SoftBank has invested $215 million in Norwegian education start-up Kahoot, taking a 9.7% stake in the company, as demand for online learning platforms skyrockets during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Oslo-based firm said Tuesday it had agreed to sell 43 million new shares at a price of 46 Norwegian krone — or about $5 — per share to SoftBank. It plans to use funds raised from the deal to fuel growth through new partnerships, joint ventures and acquisitions, CEO Eilert Hanoa told CNBC.

“It’s all about the general switch in mindset from digital tools being a nice-to-have additional set of features in schools and classrooms, to being maybe the most important toolkit they can use to create engagement,” Hanoa said in an interview Tuesday.

Founded in 2012, Kahoot is a game-based learning service that lets players create and take part in multiple-choice quizzes. One side of the business focuses on schools and home learning, while the other centers on corporate clients looking to make training sessions and presentations.

Educational technology, or “edtech,” has flourished this year as the coronavirus pandemic forced schools to close and increased demand for remote learning software. That’s grabbed the attention of investors: Microsoft, for example, invested over $1 million in U.K.-based computing start-up Kano for a minority stake.

And Kahoot is no exception, securing a $28 million round of funding in June. The company, which is listed on Oslo’s Merkur Market, has seen its shares skyrocket over 150% since the start of the year. Hanoa said the

Broadband Internet Pilot to Support Access to Healthcare, Jobs and Education for Thousands in Rural Virginia

– Projects in the Northern Neck, Surry and Botetourt counties will help bridge the digital divide in Virginia through partnerships with Internet Service Providers

– Pilot projects will help improve economic and education opportunities related to broadband access in unserved areas of Virginia, if approved

– Dominion Energy Virginia to serve as middle mile provider, enabled by the Grid Transformation & Security Act of 2018

RICHMOND, Va., Oct. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Residents in rural parts of Virginia could gain access to broadband internet critical for jobs, healthcare and education under three pilot projects proposed Oct. 1 by Dominion Energy Virginia.  


(PRNewsfoto/Dominion Energy)

Thanks to support from the Virginia General Assembly and collaboration with electric cooperatives and Internet Service Providers, the proposed Rural Broadband Pilot projects would extend broadband internet to citizens in Surry County, Botetourt County and the Northern Neck, if approved by the State Corporation Commission. The proposal includes nearly 300 miles of middle-mile fiber and would cost approximately $29 million to construct.

“With so many Virginians working and learning from home due to COVID-19, access to reliable internet is an absolute necessity,” said Ed Baine, president of Dominion Energy Virginia. “We hope these partnerships are the first of many, and we’re optimistic about how much these efforts could help communities here in our home state.”

More than 500,000 Virginians still live without easy access to high-speed internet. Extending broadband internet access would support economic development, social equity, public safety, educational opportunities, and healthcare services for citizens of the Commonwealth.

In rural areas, it’s not cost effective for Internet Service Providers to lay the fiber necessary to reach less-populated communities with broadband internet. Dominion Energy is in a unique position to help bridge the digital gap. The company is installing new infrastructure as it moves forward