Keysight Technologies Enhances PathWave Software Suite with Cloud Processing to Eliminate Design Workflow Limitations

Enables engineers to focus on improved designs and device reliability while reducing project risk

Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: KEYS), a leading technology company that helps enterprises, service providers and governments accelerate innovation to connect and secure the world, announced it has expanded the company’s PathWave Software Suite with new and enhanced capabilities. The new PathWave solutions enable engineers to remove computational limitations across the workflow, with cloud processing clusters, to improve designs and device reliability, while reducing project risk.

Design and test engineers are struggling with complexity limitations that require weeks, if not months, of crunching data which can significantly slow the development process and market introduction. Keysight’s PathWave, an open, scalable, and predictive software platform, offers fast and efficient data processing, sharing and analysis at every stage in the product development workflow. Combining design software, instrument control and application-specific test software, it enables engineers to address increasing design, test, and measurement complexity and develop optimal electronic products.

“Keysight continues to invest in software solutions through new capabilities in our PathWave platform,” said Jay Alexander, chief technology officer at Keysight Technologies. “We are confident these new capabilities will enable our customers to bring computational power into their own design and test workflows – accelerating time to results, time to insights, and ultimately time to market.”

Further strengthening the capabilities of PathWave, Keysight is launching 5 new and enhanced software solutions that leverage the power of cloud processing to address computational limitations throughout the design process, including:

PathWave Advanced Design System (ADS) Software 2021

Now equipped with design cloud simulation services, PathWave ADS 2021 software reduces simulation time, increases simulation test coverage and provides access to scalable hardware resources in the cloud. This new software solution eliminates barriers to developing high performance hardware products by enabling design engineers for mobile and

New Design for iPhone 12 Revealed by iCloud Website Among Other Details

Apple is all set to launch the new iPhone later tonight at 10:30 PM, however it seems like we already have a huge hint about what to expect. The hint comes from Apple’s own iCloud website where icons for the new iPhone were uploaded to the server. While the images were not of high resolution, it still gave away vital information about the next iPhone. When comparing the new icons to the iPhone 11 icons, you can see a slight difference that iPhone fans have been wanting for a while. 

Apple’s Website Gives A Massive Hint About The iPhone 12© 9to5Mac

The image was first spotted by AppleSWUpdates on Twitter and later confirmed by 9to5Mac who was able to get these images in better quality. Both sources confirm that Apple has added four new icons to the server which sort of confirms that Apple will be launching four new models later tonight. 

The icons were discovered in the iCloud web apps and also on the Find My app. When comparing the new iPhone icons to the iPhone 11 and the iPhone XR, the first thing you will notice is that the edges of the new devices are different. It has been long rumoured that the new iPhones will use the classic body design of the iPhone 4 where it is more square than curved at the edges. 

Apple’s Website Gives A Massive Hint About The iPhone 12
© PhoneArena

The other major hint that one can notice is that at least one particular model will have a slightly smaller notch which has been requested by iPhone users for a very long time. This is good news as it creates more room on the display for content without obstruction by a massive notch. There could be a chance that these icons are just placeholders for the time being as previous rumours have suggested the new iPhones are expected to remove

More Bad News For Apple As iPhone 13 Design Exposed

Apple’s iPhone 12 range has been revealed in detail and it brings several compromises which might put you off upgrading. But if you’re still on the fence, the first iPhone 13 information should convince you to save your money. 

MORE FROM FORBESApple iOS 14 Has 25 Great Secret Features

Just days before the iPhone 12 big reveal, respected industry insiders Jon Prosser, Ice Universe and Ross Young have all revealed Apple is set to make the design and display changes everyone wanted for the iPhone 12 series. 

Both Prosser and Ice Universe agree that Apple will finally reduce the size of the notch with iPhone 13. That said, they disagree on how this will be done. Ice Universe states that Apple will make it shallower (vertically) while Prosser understands that Apple will make it shorter (horizontally). The disagreement likely stems from Apple having multiple prototypes at this stage of development, something that has caused confusion before. Either way, it’s a win. 

Building on this, display specialist Ross Young reveals the iPhone 13 will reintroduce Touch ID (likely in-display and pandemic driven) alongside Face ID, come with larger camera sensors than the iPhone 12 models and adopt LTPO panels. LTPO is extremely power efficient and was expected to enable 120Hz ProMotion displays on the iPhone 12 line-up, but Samsung reserved all available stock for its Galaxy Note 20 Ultra this year and ProMotion was scrapped. The iPhone 13 will fix this. 

A further inevitable benefit will be 5G. While the iPhone 12 line-up all have 5G, speeds will be limited outside the US due to high pricing and restricted availability. Expect 5G modems to be cheaper,

You’ve Heard Of Computer-Aided Design. What About Computer-Aided Biology?

In the early days of the semiconductor industry, integrated circuits were designed by one or two engineers with slide-rules, hand-drawn on paper, and then given to a lithographer to print onto silicon wafers. As circuits became more complex, blueprints gave way to software. These digitally represented designs were much more than a reproduction of a pencil sketch: productivity, design quality, and communication all improved rapidly thanks to software’s ability to codify desired behaviors into actionable layouts, while also allowing for easy, iterative design improvements.

Today, large teams of engineers design circuits using high-level languages that automate the process, and chip layouts more detailed than a street map of the entire U.S. can be generated automatically. The result has been a revolution in engineering and design, manifesting itself as Moore’s Law and the Information Age itself.

Today, a similar revolution is happening in biology, most notably in the field of synthetic biology. And comparisons between computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided biology (CAB) are hardly accidental.

Biology, like integrated circuit design, is complicated.

In recent years, automation has revolutionized how we “do” biology: driving down the cost of sequencing, facilitating open-source science, and pushing screening and many other processes towards higher throughput. In parallel, this trend has pushed biological experimentation into the realm of “big data,” where the inherent complexity of biology is finally beginning to be codified in the form of large datasets from increasingly optimized experimentation. 

However, the engineering and synthetic biology world has not quite been able to harness and systematize these developments into a sustainable positive feedback loop. Single-factor experiments, such as the one described above, remain the norm because of how this automation has scaled — in the form of liquid handling robots or electronic “lab notebook” technology, for example, but not at the foundational

All the design clues, from colors to sizes

Analysts suggest Apple is on the cusp of launching its latest generation of superphone, with an event announced for Oct. 13 (you can livestream Apple’s event from home — here’s how to watch). The current hottest rumors suggest that we may see multiple versions of the iPhone 12, with features like 5G, lidar depth mapping and the latest A14 Bionic processor. (And here are some features on our iPhone 12 wish list that Apple should steal from Samsung.)  But what will the phone look like? Let’s dive into the rumor mill to work it out.



a screen shot of a computer: A concept mockup of the iPhone 12. Phone Arena


© Provided by CNET
A concept mockup of the iPhone 12. Phone Arena

Read more: Is iPhone 12 cheaper than iPhone 11? Here’s what we’ve heard about price

Every iPhone 12 feature we expect Apple to announce

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Multiple iPhone 12 sizes



a screen shot of a computer


© Phone Arena


First up, the physical size of the phone. Mobile industry analysts suggest that there will be four iterations of the phone, with the smallest being the new 5.4-inch iPhone 12 Mini. Then there’s the two base models, the iPhone 12 and 12 Pro, both expected to be 6.1 inches, making them slightly bigger than the current iPhone 11 Pro’s 5.8-inch size.

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Finally, there’s the big one, the iPhone 12 Pro Max. With a rumored screen size of 6.7 inches, you’ll need a pretty big pocket to keep this beast comfortably housed. 

Physical design, cameras and notch

Various rumors have pointed towards an update to the outer metal edging of the iPhone 12, which will sport a flat, chamfered-edge metal design, much like the edging seen on the recent iPad Pro . PhoneArena’s mockup, above, shows the potential look and it’s one I’m very keen on. The mockup also shows