House report is sharply critical of Treasury’s handling of payroll program

Ultimately, the subcommittee concluded that instead of preserving jobs, the Trump administration’s implementation of the Payroll Support Program “significantly weakened the Program’s impact on job preservation.”

The subcommittee’s assessment comes in stark contrast to how the program has played out for passenger airlines, which received the bulk of the more than $25 billion that was allocated to pay front-line workers. Airline and union leaders say the program saved tens of thousands of jobs until it expired Oct. 1 and have been aggressively pushing to extend it through the end of March.

“The Payroll Support Program has supported hundreds of thousands of aviation industry jobs, kept workers employed and connected to their healthcare, and played a critical role in preserving the U.S. airline industry,” the Treasury Department said in a statement. “Implementation focused first on the largest employers to help stabilize an industry in crisis and support as many jobs as possible for as long as possible. Treasury provided over 80% of the requested funds supporting over four hundred thousand jobs within 26 days of the enactment of the CARES Act.”

The subcommittee’s report also slammed contractors for laying off workers even as they sought to secure government aid.

“Documents uncovered during the Select Subcommittee’s investigation show that aviation contractors sought to avoid ‘unnecessary costs’ by terminating employees before executing [Payroll Support Program] agreements,” the report said.

The report found that aviation contractors laid off or furloughed nearly 58,000 employees before applying for assistance through the Payroll Support Program, 17 times the number reported by passenger carriers. At least 16,655 employees were laid off or furloughed between when the application period opened and when companies finalized their agreement with the Treasury Department.

The subcommittee said briefings with Treasury officials and contractors as well as its review of tens of thousands of

Editorial, 9/30: Programming, visits critical for inmates during COVID | Editorial



Nebraska State Penitentiary

Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln




Almost everyone knows a family member, a friend or an acquaintance in an assisted living center or care facility who has been impacted by COVID-19 quarantining.

Residents have often been unable to receive visitors or take part in the programming or activities that enrich their lives. For some the mental and physical toll has been dramatic.

It’s easy to sympathize with them, and their struggles have received media attention.

A group affected every bit as much as many senior citizens – though easier to ignore and, perhaps, harder to sympathize with – is prison inmates.

Group living arrangements have been an easy place for COVID to spread – whether it’s senior housing or fraternities and sororities on campus. But perhaps even more dangerous is the spread possible among inmates in the custody of the corrections department.

Though slow at first, COVID testing in prisons has accelerated. And so have infections.

As a response, prison officials have taken the prudent steps to separate inmates, isolate them, curtail visitation and halt programming.

While these moves have potential to help control the spread of COVID among inmates and the community at large via visitors, they aren’t without their impacts.

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