COVID-19 Impact Reveals Global Leadership Crisis, According to New Global Survey

The Milken Institute and The Harris Poll today released the findings of a joint research program called “The Listening Project,” finding a global void in leadership as the COVID-19 pandemic has killed more than one million people worldwide and has crippled international economies.

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Source: Milken Institute and The Harris Poll, “The Listening Project”

The global survey, which was conducted in two phases (before and during COVID-19*) among nearly 30,000 people across 27 countries, found “access and affordability to healthcare” and “communicable/infectious disease containment and prevention” tied as the top two priorities on the list. “Corruption and transparency” rose to the third most urgent problem, as citizens became frustrated with government’s handling of COVID-19 around the globe.

“The Listening Project” demonstrates the widespread lack of support for how countries have handled COVID-19. For example:

  • Globally, 71% of respondents said “this is the lowest point in my country’s history.”

  • Nearly two-thirds of people say that “their leaders are out of touch with the rest of the country” (63%) and that “the people running the country don’t really care what happens to me” (62%).

  • Out of 12 countries surveyed in September, in only three (Malaysia, China, and India) did more than half of the respondents strongly support their country’s handling of the pandemic.

  • In the U.S., only 29% of respondents strongly support the country’s response.

“‘The Listening Project’ confirms the most urgent global priorities for which we and our partners across corporate, government, and philanthropic sectors must develop solutions,” said Richard Ditizio, President and COO of the Milken Institute. “Through the Milken Institute’s convening and programmatic platforms, we help leaders, experts, and influencers step up to the challenges in front of us, whether it’s rapidly developing vaccines and treatments, increasing access

Business leaders say global economy faces worst crisis in a century

  • Business leaders from the engagement group Business Twenty (B20) have called for urgent reforms to be made if the global economy is to recover from its worst crisis in a century due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • “The global economy is in its worst state in a century,” warned Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of the B20. 
  • B20 proposed 25 recommendations for the G-20 group that fall into three key areas, including empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Top business leaders around the world say the global economy is experiencing its worst crisis in one hundred years and have called for urgent reforms to be implemented in the G-20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia in November.

The Business Twenty (B20), an engagement group of high-level CEOs worldwide seeking to represent the business community, put forward 25 policy recommendations on Monday for the meeting of the Group of 20 richest nations next month. These suggested reforms would help put the economy on a strong road to recovery once the pandemic comes to an end, the group said.

Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of the B20 warned that “the global economy is in its worst state in a century,” adding that “the challenging opportunity is to build back better, with real urgency required from policymakers and business leaders.”

Al-Benyan said, “As the economic recovery evolves over the next couple of years, downside risks remain elevated,” including trade tensions, policy uncertainty, geopolitical strains and building financial vulnerabilities, as countries try to overcome the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus has already claimed over a million lives around the world and has brought the global economy to its knees. In its most recent report, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development(OECD) warned global growth would drop by 4.5% this

Neuromorphic computing could solve the tech industry’s looming crisis

What’s the best computer in the world? The most souped-up, high-end gaming rig? Whatever supercomputer took the number one spot in the TOP500 this year? The kit inside the datacentres that Apple or Microsoft rely on? Nope: it’s the one inside your skull. 

As computers go, brains are way ahead of the competition. They’re small, lightweight, have low energy consumption, and are amazingly adaptable. And they’re also set to be the model for the next wave of advanced computing.

These brain-inspired designs are known collectively as ‘neuromorphic computing’. Even the most advanced computers don’t come close to the human brain — or even most mammal brains — but our grey matter can give engineers and developers a few pointers on how to make computing infrastrastructure more efficient, by mimicking the brain’s own synapses and neurones.

SEE: Building the bionic brain (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

First, the biology. Neurones are nerve cells, and work as the cabling that carries messages from one part of the body to the other. Those messages are passed from one neurone to another until they reach the right part of the body where they can produce an effect — by causing us to be aware of pain, move a muscle, or form a sentence, for example. 

The way that neurones pass on messages to each other is across a gap is called a synapse. Once a neurone has received enough input to trigger it, it passes a chemical or electrical impulse, known as an action potential, onto the next neurone, or onto another cell, such as a muscle or gland. 

Next, the technology. Neuromorphic computing software seeks to recreate these action potentials through spiking neural networks (SNNs). SNNs are made of neurons that signal to other neurons by generating their own action potentials, conveying information as they

Queen stresses need for trusted news sources during Covid crisis

The Queen has issued a message of support to the British newspaper industry, praising traditional media outlets.

The monarch said that “having trusted, reliable sources of information, particularly at a time when there are so many sources competing for our attention, is vital”.



Elizabeth II wearing a pink hat: Photograph: John Stillwell/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: John Stillwell/AFP/Getty Images


In a letter to the News Media Association, the industry organisation that represents all major national and local newspaper publishers, the Queen said: “The Covid-19 pandemic has once again demonstrated what an important public service the established news media provides, both nationally and regionally.

“The efforts of the news media to support communities throughout the United Kingdom during the pandemic have been invaluable – whether through fundraising, encouraging volunteering, or providing a lifeline for the elderly and vulnerable to the outside world.”

The statement was issued to coincide with the launch of the News Media Association’s Journalism Matters campaign, which is designed to shore up public and government support for established news outlets.

The Queen’s intervention was accompanied by an article from the organisation’s chairman, Henry Faure Walker, in which he railed against US tech companies taking advertising income that used to go to newspapers.

He said: “For too long, Google and Facebook have had a free pass at using our journalism on their platforms making huge profits, whilst contributing comparatively nothing back into the industry.”

Last week Google pledged to pay $1bn to licence content from news publishers around the world over the next three years, although this remains a fraction of the amount that the global newspaper industry has lost in advertising revenue over the last two decades.

Faure Walker, the chief executive of the financially struggling local newspaper group Newsquest, also called for further state intervention to prop up newspaper groups, on top of the

How Wildgoose reinvented itself during the COVID-19 crisis

30-second summary:

  • Distinctly’s SEO Manager, Matt Finch provides insight on how the team worked with events company Wildgoose to pivot quickly in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • When lockdown began, Wildgoose’s sales and pipeline took an immediate downturn, with a year on year drop in sales of 62% for the month of April.
  • Operational costs were tightened along with evaluations of the marketing and tech spend, and Wildgoose was forced to downsize its workforce by over 50%.
  • The company had to act quickly, having just launched a new website in anticipation of a record-breaking 2020.
  • What were the make or break moments and how did Wildgoose turn around the situation? Let’s find out, we hope you’re ready to make notes.

Matt Finch, SEO Manager at Distinctly, provides insight on how the team worked with events company Wildgoose to pivot quickly in the face of the Covid-19 lockdown.

Founded in 2003, Wildgoose is a global leader in corporate events and team building, winning numerous awards for the thousands of experiences it delivers across the world annually. When lockdown began, Wildgoose’s sales and pipeline took an immediate downturn, with a year on year drop in sales of 62% for the month of April.

Operational costs were tightened along with evaluations of the marketing and tech spend, and Wildgoose was forced to downsize its workforce by over 50%. The company had to act quickly, having just launched a new website in anticipation of a record-breaking 2020.

A swift decision was made to repurpose Wildgoose’s offering into a set of remote team building activities to connect people virtually. This pivot would ultimately prove not only to protect the company’s immediate future but to help it thrive, and was backed up by an SEO campaign from Distinctly with three-month areas of focus in place.