Marquee Sports Network adds Chicago Bears content to fill its post-baseball programming void

In a bid to fill its post-baseball programming void, the Cubs’ Marquee Sports Network is partnering with the Chicago Bears on a half-hour program, “Bear Essentials,” that will be followed each week by a days-old, two-hour edit of the football team’s previous game.

The two schedule additions will debut Wednesday on Marquee, the TV platform launched as primary home of Cubs baseball earlier this year by the team and Sinclair Broadcast Group.

“Bear Essentials” is slated for 7 p.m., followed at 7:30 p.m. by the abridged version of the Bears’ 20-19 victory over the Buccaneers from six nights earlier with Joe Buck and Troy Aikman on the call.

Typically, Marquee said, the Bears shows will run on Tuesday evenings.

“Bear Essentials” will be hosted by Marquee studio fixture Cole Wright, an ESPN and NFL Network alumnus. Wright will be joined by team personnel and analysts reviewing at the previous game and looking ahead to the next one.

“We’re excited to bring Bears fans more access to the news and information they crave,” Scott Hagel, the Bears’ senior vice president of marketing and communications, said in the announcement.

The Bears were tenants at Wrigley Field, home of the Cubs, from 1921-70 after leaving downstate Decatur and before moving to Soldier Field.

“Given our long and storied history together and the special relationship between the McCaskey and Ricketts families, a reunion of Cubs and Bears programming on Marquee feels incredibly natural,” said Cubs President of Business Operations Crane Kenney in a statement referring to the families that control the two franchises.

———

©2020 the Chicago Tribune

Visit the Chicago Tribune at www.chicagotribune.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Source Article

Revived All Def Digital Charts Broader Content, Partnerships Under New Ownership

A year after All Def Digital, one of the web’s biggest Black-owned digital sites, collapsed in the aftermath of #MeToo allegations against founder Russell Simmons, the reborn company is charting a new course led by two former tech executives and backed by an ownership group that includes music and sports notables such as T.I., Killer Mike, Jason Geter, and Baron Davis.

The new ADD is moving beyond the original platform’s tight digital focus on hip hop, comedy and slam poetry. Under new CEO Cedric J. Rogers and partner Shaun Newsum, the new ADD is exploring more genres and distribution approaches. It’s also expanding relationships and programming ventures with traditional media companies, working with WarnerMedia-owned FullScreen, and Comcast
CMCSA
-backed production company Jupiter Entertainment, to beef up its programming, creator networks, brand relationships, and several new initiatives.

Rogers and Newsum are engineers by training, working respectively at Apple and what’s now called Disney Streaming Services. By 2018, though, they had launched Culture Genesis to produce programming for underserved “black and brown” audiences online, Rogers said. The company worked with Kevin Hart’s LOL Network and Steve Harvey’s production company Harvey International before bringing to All Def Bar Exam, a digital game show about hip hop music.

Then, things fell apart for ADD. Simmons was one of a number of high-profile entertainment executives facing multiple accusations of sexual misconduct, and stepped away from the company in 2017. Last year, as funding and business relationships dried up, ADD went into bankruptcy.

Ultimately, through a bankruptcy process called Assignment for Benefit of Creditors, Culture Genesis was tabbed to take over the ADD assets, in part because it already had relationships with many

Facebook bans Holocaust-denial content after allowing it for years

  • Facebook announced Monday it was changing its hate speech policy to “prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust.”
  • The company has faced criticism for more than a decade over its refusal to moderate anti-Semitic content that distorts or denies the Holocaust, when Nazis and their allies systematically killed 6 million Jews, happened.
  • In the weeks leading up to the 2020 presidential election, Facebook has attempted to mitigate criticism that it fails to prevent the spread of dangerous conspiracy theories and disinformation on its platform. Just last week, Facebook said it banned QAnon accounts across its platforms.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Facebook has banned Holocaust-denial content from the platform after years of criticism over its refusal to take action against such anti-Semitic rhetoric.

Facebook announced Monday it was updating its hate speech policy to “prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust.”

The policy change marks an abrupt about-face on Facebook’s refusal, for more than a decade, to remove content from its platform that denies the existence of the Holocaust and the genocide of millions of Jews and other minority groups. The platform has faced pressure from human rights and civil rights groups to take a stricter stance against such content, but Facebook has maintained that the “mere statement” of Holocaust denial doesn’t violate policies.

“I’m Jewish, and there’s a set of people who deny that the Holocaust happened. I find that deeply offensive,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg told Recode in July 2018. “But at the end of the day, I don’t believe that our platform should take that down because I think there are things that different people get wrong.”

In the meantime, it appears that Holocaust-denial content on Facebook has continued to not just exist, but flourish. A recent study, published in August by

Facebook, in a reversal, will now ban Holocaust denial content under its hate speech policy

Facebook this morning announced a significant change in how it approaches Holocaust denial content on its social network. For years, the company has been criticized for not taking down this extremely offensive form of content in favor of allowing free speech and distancing itself from taking on the responsibilities of a traditional publisher. Today, it’s reversing that position, saying it will now update its hate speech policy to “prohibit any content that denies or distorts the Holocaust.”

The company said it made the decision amid a growing number of online hate speech attacks and is a part of Facebook’s newer efforts to fight the spread of hate speech across its platform.

“We have banned more than 250 white supremacist organizations and updated our policies to address militia groups and QAnon,” explained Facebook in an announcement. “We also routinely ban other individuals and organizations globally, and we took down 22.5 million pieces of hate speech from our platform in the second quarter of this year. Following a year of consultation with external experts, we recently banned anti-Semitic stereotypes about the collective power of Jews that often depicts them running the world or its major institutions,” the company said.

Facebook also shared some disturbing statistics representative of how its inaction on this front has impacted the world. It said that according to a recent survey of U.S. adults, ages 18-39, nearly a quarter said they believed the Holocaust was a myth, that it had been exaggerated or that they weren’t sure.

The company noted, too, that institutions focused on Holocaust research and remembrance, such as Yad Vashem have stressed that Holocaust education is a key component in combating anti-Semitism.

As many may recall, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg once used Holocaust denial as an example of where he thought Facebook shouldn’t intervene with

Pakistan bans TikTok for ‘immoral’ content

The Pakistan Telecommunication Authority (PTA) on Friday issued instructions to block controversial video-sharing platform TikTok.

In a statement, the PTA said the ban followed a number of complaints about the type of content shared on the app.

“In view of a number of complaints from different segments of the society against immoral/indecent content on the video-sharing application TikTok, Pakistan Telecommunication Authority has issued instructions for blocking of the application,” it wrote.

The PTA said after considering the complaints, as well as the nature of the content being “consistently” posted, it issued a final notice to the application.

The watchdog said it gave TikTok considerable time to respond and comply with its instructions for “development of effective mechanism for proactive moderation of unlawful online content”.

“However, the application failed to fully comply with the instructions, therefore, directions were issued for blocking of TikTok application in the country,” it continued.

“TikTok has been informed that the Authority is open for engagement and will review its decision subject to a satisfactory mechanism by TikTok to moderate unlawful content.”

In late August, a video of a man dying by suicide was posted on Facebook. The graphic video spread across other platforms such as Instagram, Twitter, and Youtube, but it continued to appear on TikTok weeks later as the app struggled to remove the horrific content.

The PTA had at the time asked TikTok to “block the vulgar, indecent, and immoral content for viewership in Pakistan”.

It asked the platform to put in place stronger content monitoring and moderation mechanisms so that unlawful material could not be accessed or viewed within Pakistan.

It also asked similar requests of Youtube, demanding the Facebook-owned site to “block vulgar, indecent, immoral, nude, and hate speech content for viewing in Pakistan”.

“PTA has done so keeping in view the