R-Truth hilariously tries to get AJ Styles to break character during WWE programming

R-Truth has been one of WWE’s comedic gems for years now and he shows no signs of letting up.

The 48-year-old was assigned to RAW during WWE’s 2020 brand draft this week and it looks like the 24/7 champion will be remaining on Monday nights for another year.

R-Truth and AJ Styles had a good back and forth

R-Truth and AJ Styles had a good back and forth

He kicked off his new stint with an appearance on the show that follows RAW on the WWE Network, RAW Talk.

Truth has become wildly entertaining on these chat shows and many superstars, no matter how serious their character, cannot help but laugh when the veteran gets going.

Shayna Baszler has been the victim of Truth before, but this time it was AJ Styles Truth tried to ruffle.

As you can see from the clip below, Truth wants to know if Styles really built the SmackDown house.

“I want to ask you something,” he began. “I know SmackDown was the house that AJ Styles built, but do you do condominiums, duplexes, two, three story houses?”

Styles targeted the host, Charly Caruso, saying: “Charly, you’re an enabler. That’s what you are. You know he’s talking nonsense and yet you continue to help him out with his nonsense.

“Condominiums, little homes – what? What are we doing here?”

Truth replied: “So you didn’t build the SmackDown house?!”

Styles said: “It’s the house that AJ Styles built but it doesn’t mean that I actually built it by hand. I’m saying it wouldn’t be what it is today without AJ Styles, that’s what I’m saying.

Truth: “Dawg, I was going to ask you for a card of something. That’s disappointing, man! That’s false advertising.”

R-Truth has been a wildly entertaining 24/7 champion

R-Truth has been a wildly entertaining 24/7 champion

Truth has enjoyed a long and successful career in WWE and has worked with

7 Countries Tell Facebook To Break Encryption

The governments of seven countries are calling on Facebook and other tech firms to do the technically impossible – to weaken encryption by giving law enforcement access to messages, whilst not reducing user safety.

The governments of the U.S., U.K., Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India and Japan have issued the joint statement which pleads with Facebook specifically, as well as other tech firms, to drop “end-to-end encryption policies which erode the public’s safety online”.

The governments once again raise the issue of child abusers and terrorists using encrypted services such as WhatsApp to send messages without fear of content being intercepted.

“We owe it to all of our citizens, especially our children, to ensure their safety by continuing to unmask sexual predators and terrorists operating online,” the U.K.’s home secretary, Priti Patel, said in a statement.

“It is essential that tech companies do not turn a blind eye to this problem and hamper their, as well as law enforcement’s, ability to tackle these sickening criminal acts. Our countries urge all tech companies to work with us to find a solution that puts the public’s safety first.”

Encryption muddle

Once again, the politicians seem unable to grasp one of the fundamental concepts of end-to-end encryption – that putting back doors into the encryption algorithms that allow security services to intercept messages effectively breaks the encryption.

According to the U.K. government’s statement, the “seven signatories of the international statement have made it clear that when end-to-end encryption is applied with no access to content, it severely undermines the ability of companies to take action against illegal activity on their own platforms”.

Yet, end-to-encryption with the ability for third parties to intercept content is not end-to-end encryption in any meaningful sense. Worse, by introducing back

Are Tech’s Big Four Smart Enough to Break Themselves Up?

House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee Chair David Cicilline.
Photo: Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images

Buried in the one of the most chaotic news cycles of the year, earlier this week the House Judiciary Committee published a report based on its 15-month investigation into the antitrust potential of tech’s big four: Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon. “To put it simply, companies that once were scrappy, underdog startups that challenged the status quo have become the kinds of monopolies we last saw in the era of oil barons and railroad tycoons,” the 449-page report from the antitrust subcommittee states. “They not only wield tremendous power, but they also abuse it by charging exorbitant fees, imposing oppressive contract terms, and extracting valuable data from the people and businesses that rely on them.”

On the most recent episode of the New York podcast Pivot, co-hosts Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway consider the massive investigation and why the firms would be smart not to push back on antitrust actions that are now looking inevitable.

Kara Swisher: To recap, the House Democrats proposed a massive overhaul of U.S. laws that could make it easier to break up giant tech companies — probably all companies, for that matter. But according to the New York Times, there is disagreement among Democrats and Republicans on how to regulate these firms; Republicans thought that was a nuclear option.

So what do you think about all this?

Scott Galloway: The report was very simple and straightforward. Facebook has a monopoly. Amazon abuses its retail partners. I mean, it just kind of stated the obvious question, of ‘What actually happens today?’ But it was simple. It was elegant. It was common sense.

Twice weekly, Scott Galloway and Kara Swisher host Pivot, a New York Magazine podcast about business, technology, and politics.

IBM to break up 109-year old company to focus on cloud growth

By Munsif Vengattil

(Reuters) – International Business Machines Corp <IBM.N> is splitting itself into two public companies, capping a years-long effort by the world’s first big computing firm to diversify away from its legacy businesses to focus on high-margin cloud computing.

IBM will list its IT infrastructure services unit, which provides technical support for 4,600 clients in 115 countries and has a backlog of $60 billion, as a separate company with a new name by the end of 2021.

The new company will have 90,000 employees and its leadership structure will be decided in a few months, Chief Financial Officer James Kavanaugh told Reuters.

IBM, which currently has more than 352,000 workers, said it expects to record nearly $5 billion in expenses related to the separation and operational changes.

Investors cheered the surprise move by Chief Executive Officer Arvind Krishna, the key architect behind IBM’s $34 billion acquisition of cloud company Red Hat last year, sending the company’s shares up 7%.

“We divested networking back in the ’90s, we divested PCs back in the 2000s, we divested semiconductors about five years ago because all of them didn’t necessarily play into the integrated value proposition,” Krishna said on a call with analysts.

BIG BLUE’S NEW FOCUS

In a blog, Krishna called the move a “significant shift” in the 109-year-old company’s business model.

“IBM is essentially getting rid of a shrinking, low-margin operation given the cannibalizing impact of automation and cloud, masking stronger growth for the rest of the operation,” Wedbush Securities analyst Moshe Katri said.

IBM, which has sought to make up for slowing software sales and seasonal demand for its mainframe servers, said it would now focus on open hybrid cloud and AI solutions that will account for more than half of its recurring revenues.

Krishna, who replaced Ginni Rometty

House Democrats push Congress to break up Big Tech monopolies

Congress should consider forcing the breakup of Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google into smaller companies that can’t enter into adjacent lines of business (via NBC News). That’s the main recommendation of a 449-page Democrats on the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust published on Tuesday following the panel’s 16-month investigation into big tech that saw the CEOs from all four companies testify before Congress. They say all four companies enjoy monopolies in at least one of the verticals in which they operate.   

“During the investigation, Subcommittee staff found evidence of monopolization and monopoly power,” the report says. It goes on to argue the dominance of Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google has “diminished consumer choice, eroded innovation and entrepreneurship in the U.S. economy, weakened the vibrancy of the free and diverse press and undermined Americans’ privacy.” 

Perhaps most notably, the report concludes Apple enjoys a monopoly in app distribution on iOS devices. “Apple leverages its control of iOS and the App Store to create and enforce barriers to competition and discriminate against and exclude rivals while preferencing its own offerings,” the report says. “Apple also uses its power to exploit app developers through misappropriation of competitively sensitive information and to charge app developers supra-competitive prices within the App Store.”

Apple’s control of the App Store is at the heart of the company’s ongoing legal feud with Fortnite developer Epic Games. In August, Epic bypassed the App Store with its Mega Drop promotion, giving mobile players the option to pay for the title’s in-game currency directly. When Apple removed Fortnite from the App Store, Epic launched a lawsuit against the company.

Among other recommendations, the report also suggests strengthing antitrust laws and requiring dominant tech companies to make their platforms compatible with the services of their competitors.

“The totality of